How to Become a Millwright in Canada: An Industry Overview

Becoming a Millwright in Canada

How to Become a Millwright in Canada: An Industry Overview

Before we dive into the matter of how to become a Millwright in Canada, we first have to understand what a millwright does. We need to get a holistic understanding of the pay grade that they face in the industry, the work conditions, and so on. To begin, a millwright’s primary responsibilities include assembling, installing, dismantling, and just working with heavy machinery of all types. 

Typically, they work with very advanced machines in commercial manufacturing industries such as power generation, mining, construction, food processing plants, and even the automobile industry.

The Different Types of Millwrights and Millwright Licenses

There are essentially two broad classifications of millwright licenses, according to Michael Samson, an accounts manager, and recruiter at Pure Staffing Solutions. In an interview, he revealed that these categories are Industrial Millwrights which carry the license 433A and the other one is 426A, which is a Construction Millwright.

“Industrial Millwright 433A can work in any industry across Canada. The construction millwright is more specifically a certified program, designed for construction sites and other such work environments like power plants, the marine industry, and so on,” said Samson.

He went on to elaborate how there are also higher levels of classifications that specify where in Canada you can work. “There are two types of millwright categories, one is a Red Seal Millwright and then there are Journeyman Millwrights. The Red Seal Millwright is an interprovincial Millwright License. If someone has a Red Seal License can work anywhere in Canada. The Journeyman Millwright License holders can only work in certain provinces. E.g. if someone got a Journeyman License in Ontario, they can work only in Ontario.”

Samson went on to explain, “However, if the Journeyman Millwright knows the National Industry Standards, and they take an exam, they could qualify to work in other provinces as well. They will be given a Journeyman Red Seal License.”

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” – Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the U.S.A

The Average Salary You Can Expect

The average pay for an industrial Millwright in Canada is $65,496 per year which comes to about $31 per hour. However, when we look at the Salary range, it can start anywhere from $47,000 per year to $80,000 a year. New apprentices who are just starting, get paid at the lower end of the pay scale. Once they get their licenses, it goes towards the higher end.

New millwrights also get an average bonus of $1,146. Keep in mind that it varies from company to company, some offer a signing bonus and some offer profit sharing.

Becoming a Millwright in Canada

As an example, Pure Staffing Solutions has one client who offers a $1,500 signing bonus and once they complete one year they get another $1,500. The commercial Automobile industry is a prime place for high salaries as they pay an average minimum of $40 per hour, one of the highest pay rates that a millwright can get in the country.

Becoming a Millwright Canada

There are a few different ways to go about it, if you are wondering how to become a millwright in Canada. While formal education isn’t the hard and fast rule, it does give you a significant advantage. The same is true of apprenticeships. While it is not necessary, it does equip you with a certain set of skills that allow you to gain a stronger career footing in the industry.

“Do what you love and success will follow. Passion is the fuel behind a successful career. – Meg Witman, American Business Executive

Becoming a Millwright in Canada

Education

If you are taking the educational route, you need a minimum qualification of a high school degree or equivalent to get a job as a millwright. Having this means that you would be eligible to study higher, get the prerequisite training and write the exam in your quest to becoming a millwright in Canada.

Apprenticeships

This method goes hand-in-hand with education. If you want to work as a licensed millwright, then you need to do an apprenticeship. Samson explains it as follows, ” Once they have they (millwright aspirants) will be eligible to complete Millwright training. Typically, a Millwright completes 3 to 5 years of apprenticeship (in-field work and classroom studies). Also, each year of instruction includes 144 hours of technical instruction and up to 200 hours of paid, on-the-job training throughout the apprenticeship.”

“We’re here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why even be here? – Steve Jobs, Co-founder of Apple

Working Without a License

If you are not inclined towards the apprenticeship or educational path, you can always work as an unlicensed millwright. You should note that it is optional to have the license, but carrying one does have its perks.

“Even if you haven’t completed an apprenticeship program, but have hands-on experience and have worked with a company as an unlicensed Millwright you can challenge the exam directly and get the license,” said Samson.

Samson added, “Someone can work without a license, but if you have a license, your value in the market goes up. For example, some of our clients offer a bonus of an additional $1 or $2 on top of the industry standard for Millwrights with a Red Seal License. If you don’t have the license, you will only be paid the industry standard.”

Conclusion

At the end of the day, the choice is on you. When the question of how to becoming a millwright in Canada arises, the path is straight forward. It has a lot of benefits and even more so if you are fully qualified. Given the country’s booming industry and high levels of demand for skilled workers in this field, employment is not scarce. However, the competition is high.

Therefore, even if the path to becoming a millwright in Canada is quite straightforward, you need to be able to beat out the competition. That is where we come in. At Pure Staffing Solutions, we help you identify and get placed in the best companies. So, if you truly want to give it a shot, get in touch with us and get your career started!

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Top 10 Highest-Paying Trades in Canada

Highest-paying trades in Canada

Top 10 Highest-Paying Trades in Canada

You have probably heard people saying how things are changing and how the future is here. Well, with the world becoming more and more automated, skilled positions and trades are surging in demand. This is especially true of a country like Canada as it has a vast job market with high levels of competition and demand for skilled workers. Tradespeople such as plumbers, carpenters, electricians, mechanics and millwrights are surging in demand. There is such a demand for people in this line of work, that these professions stand as some of the highest-paying trades in Canada.

Canada has a great medical care infrastructure and it stands as one of the largest economies in the world. What does that tell you? There are plenty of doctors, lawyers, and business magnates. However, there is a huge gap in the skilled workers’ category if you look at the level of demand. Hands-on skill is something that employers are willing to pay top dollar for these days. It’s with that in mind that we here at Pure Staffing Solutions have put together a list of some of the highest-paying trades in Canada!

Top 10 Highest-Paying Trades in Canada

Now, before we get into it, you should keep in mind that the following list of jobs and their average salaries were taken from data from Canada’s national statistical agency, Statistics Canada as well as a combination of other sites. While they may not be current or exact, it is relevant in the sense that it will give you a holistic idea of the different trades.

1) Industrial Electricians (NOC Code - 7242)

Electricians in general are some of the highest-paid tradespeople in Canada. Apprentices generally start on around 40% of what a fully qualified electrician earns according to CanadianVisa.Org. The average going rate for electricians can come up to somewhere around $50 an hour. Industrial electricians are part of some of the highest-paid trades in Canada.

For example, in the province of Alberta, Canada, they can earn up to $120,000 for work such as installing, maintaining, testing and repairing industrial electrical systems.

Highest-paying trades in Canada

Usually, they work for contractors or maintenance departments of factories, mines, plants, shipyards and so on. While it is a long journey to get certified to work as a professional in this field, it is well worth the struggle. All these factors combine to make this one of the highest-paying trades in Canada.

2) Industrial Mechanics and Millwrights (NOC Code - 7311)

Millwrights and industrial mechanics are skilled workers who maintain, test, troubleshoot, install and repair stationary industrial equipment. This includes things like mechanical equipment in factories, plants, mines, and so on. One particular part of the country where they earn some of the highest salaries is in Saskatchewan. Here millwrights and industrial electricians can command up to $99,000 a year for an average week of work throughout the year according to immigration.ca and Statistics Canada.

“Success seems to be connected with action. Successful people keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don’t quit. – Conrad Hilton, Founder of Hilton Hotels

3) Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics (NOC Code - 7321)

Now, there are two segments of workers in this category, we have truck and transport mechanics as well as automotive service technicians. Truck mechanics have a high demand and are one of the highest-paid trades in Canada for the simple reason of geography. Trucks and big rigs play a vital role in shipping goods across the border. Considering the average workweek, these mechanics could earn up to $100,000 per year as per the website. This is especially applicable in the Northern and North-western Territories of the country.

Now on the other hand we have automotive service technicians. They see the highest pay in the northern territory of Nunavut. While the cost of living is relatively higher than most provinces in Canada, it balances out with the high level of pay that these professionals see. At around $103,000 per year, this is right up there as one of the highest-paying trades in Canada.

highest-paying trades in Canada

4) Heavy-Duty Equipment Technicians (NOC Code - 7312)

Much like millwrights, these mechanics specialize in the repair, installation, maintenance and overhauling of heavy-duty industry mechanics. It is a tough job, to say the least, and it requires a high level of skill and qualification to perform. The job can pay around $103,000 per year according to Immigration.ca. This number applies more to the skilled individuals who find themselves completing an average workweek in Alberta, Canada.

5) Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers (NOC Code - 7252)

This group of skilled tradespeople layout, assemble, fabricate, maintain, troubleshoot and repair piping systems carrying water, steam, chemicals and fuel in heating, cooling, lubricating and other process piping systems, according to Immigration.ca. The website also mentioned how in the Atlantic Canadian province of Nova Scotia, they earn the highest salaries in the country for one reason – The Halifax Shipyard.

This shipping yard has a $25 billion contract with the Canadian navy to build combat ships. This means that the steamfitters in this place earn the highest wages in the trade at around $92,722 per year.

“All our dreams can come true if we have the courage to pursue them. – Walt Disney, American Entrepreneur

6) Welders (NOC Code - 7237)

Welders who work specifically with ferrous and non-ferrous metals as well as those who work for companies that manufacture structural steel, plate works, boilers and so on, earn the most. Generally, they can earn around $85,000 to $88,000 in the highest paying areas such as British Columbia if they work a full-time job or an average workweek. The salaries also depend on the seniority and the experience that the welder has in a particular field.

7) Construction Electricians (NOC Code - 7241)

Most of the skilled workers in this field are self-employed but they can work for contractors or as a part of a maintenance division. These workers are responsible for laying out, assembling, installing, testing, and repairing electrical wiring, fixtures and other related components. In provinces such as British Columbia and Ontario, they can command a salary of around $87,000 a year for an average week’s work.

8) Plumbers (NOC Code - 7251)

While the job itself might not be the most glamorous one, the earning sure is. In areas such as Ontario can make around $78,000 per year as per data taken from Salary.com. This number can range anywhere from $72,304 to $84,000 per year. However, this does not include the bonuses and benefits that they might receive over the same period.

These skilled workers install, repair and maintain pipes, fixtures and other plumbing equipment used for water distribution and wastewater disposal in residential, commercial or industrial buildings.

9) Carpenters (NOC Code - 7271)

These workers construct, maintain, repair construction components and structures made of wood or wood substitutes, certain metals and other related materials. They can be independent, work with companies or for contractors. Working the average workweek, these skilled labourers can earn an average salary of $43,000 to $70,000 per year according to Salary explorer.

10) Long-haul Truck Drives (NOC Code - 7511)

Coming back to the trucking industry of Canada, one of the main sources of transportation of goods across the country is via trucks and big-rigs. We have already established how important the mechanics are, now we turn to the drives of these machines. Long-haul drives can earn an average of $45,000 to $55,000 per year. This plus having it as a part of your job to travel around the country is a pretty great job.

So, there you have it, these are just some of the highest-paying trades in Canada. Once again, the salaries may vary from location to location as well as other factors such as industry experience, qualifications, the company you work for, the specific line of work you specialize in and so on. All those factors aside though, this list should give you a rather good idea of how in-demand skilled workers are in Canada.

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